National News



KFOR provides you the lastest national news from ABC.

A   A   A
Share

New Jersey Examines Water Quality in Wake of Flint Water Crisis


iStock/Thinkstock(TRENTON, N.J.) — With President Obama scheduled to tour Flint, Michigan, Wednesday, concerns about water safety have been elevated to the national stage once again, leading many to speculate whether another water crisis is looming for more American cities.One example is in New Jersey, where Gov. Chris Christie ordered mandatory lead testing for all of the state’s public schools on Monday.Elevated levels of lead found in Newark Public Schools in March created panic among residents. In the city of Camden, students and public school staff have been drinking bottled water since 2002 due to deterioration of piping found in the buildings, many of which were constructed nearly a century ago.Nearly 50 percent of the residents in Newark and Camden are black, according to recent census data, similar to the demographics of Flint. A 2012 report published by a group of international water policy experts determined that African-American residents were nearly twice as likely to live in buildings with inadequate plumbing as whites.The tests announced by Christie will impact approximately 3,000 public schools. The governor hopes to reduce the level of lead in a child's blood from 10 micrograms per deciliter to five, meeting standards set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2012. The CDC says a level of 5 micrograms per deciliter is used to identify children with high levels of lead in their blood.Funding for the tests, which will cost an estimated $10 million, will not come easily for the cash-strapped state, whose debt reached $170 million in 2015, according to Truth in Accounting, a watchdog group.Improving New Jersey’s water supply has been a concern for Christie long before Flint Mayor Karen Weaver declared a state of emergency in December of last year.Christie signed the Water Infrastructure Protection Act in February of 2015, a bill designed to fast-track the privatization of the state’s public water systems. Proponents argue that the legislation would spur investment in the state’s crumbling infrastructure, but environmentalists strongly oppose it, arguing that it turns a necessity into a profit-making resource for corporations without necessarily solving the problem at hand.“What consumer protection groups find is that turning over water systems to private industry often increases the cost for residents without guaranteeing the safety that lawmakers like Christie say they want,” said Andrea Muehlebach, an associate professor at the University of Toronto who specializes in water systems.New Jersey residents are not alone in their struggles with infrastructure. An investigative report published this March in USA Today found potentially hazardous lead levels in close to 2,000 water systems across the county.Obama’s visit to Flint, which was prompted by a letter he received from Mari Copeny, an 8-year-old Flint resident requesting to meet with him, gives the president the opportunity to draw attention to the severity of the crisis.Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder will greet Obama at the airport in Flint, a spokesman for Snyder confirmed to ABC News.The spokesman also said the governor will participate in the president’s briefing with federal officials on the Flint water crisis. In April, two state regulators and one city employee were charged with misconduct, tampering and other offenses in relation to Flint's water crisis.It was unclear if Obama would drink filtered water during his stay.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

'Little Miss Flint' to Meet with Obama Before He Addresses Water Crisis


Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(FLINT, Mich.) — The 8-year-old girl who received a letter from President Obama after writing to him about Flint, Michigan, will get a chance to meet the commander-in-chief Wednesday."Little Miss Flint" Mari Copeny wrote to the president before she traveled 12 hours by bus with a group of more than 200 Flint residents to a congressional hearing on the Flint water crisis. In the letter, Mari described herself as "one of the children [affected]" by Flint's lead-filled water and stressed that meeting him or the first lady "would really lift people's spirits."The letter inspired the president to send Flint's mini-ambassador a letter of his own."You're right that Presidents are often busy, but the truth is, in America, there is no more important title than citizen," Obama wrote.Before the trip to Washington, D.C., Mari was keen on meeting the president to tell him everything she's been doing to raise awareness for Flint, her mother, Lulu Brezzell, told ABC News.Obama wrote in his letter to Mari that he wanted her to be the "first to know" about his upcoming trip to Flint. "Like you, I'll use my voice to call for change and help lift up your community," the president wrote.The meeting will take place Wednesday afternoon at Northwestern High School, where Obama will deliver remarks to a crowd of about 1,000 people, the White House told ABC News."In the end, it was my 8-year-old who convinced him that maybe it was time to come," Brezzell said, describing her daughter as a "force of nature" who "loves to use her voice"Mari told ABC News that meeting the president will be better than her birthday and Christmas and is the "most exciting thing to happen" to her."People need him to give us hope," she said of Obama, adding that the first thing she'll do is "give him a big hug."Mari received the title "Little Miss Flint" last spring after winning a local pageant, Brezzell said. Although her reign is almost over, another pageant system has offered to let her keep the title for another year because of all the awareness she's raised with it, Brezzell added.The pageant winner says her dream is to become "Miss America" and then become a police officer after that. She's been active in the efforts to help Flint, her mother said, participating in rallies and protests to raise awareness.In addition, Mari said education is an important issue to her. She enjoys cheerleading, gymnastics, tap dancing, singing and playing the violin, she said, and plans to "keep on helping" her fellow Flint residents."Cause I'm a kid that cares," Mari said. "We do not drink [the water] 'cause it's poison."Brezzell said her family is not able to cook or bathe with the water that comes out of their faucet, saying they get rashes similar to chemical burns when it touches their skin. The mother of three called Flint's water crisis "heartbreaking" and "avoidable."Mari's final message: "Don't forget Flint."Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder has called on Obama to drink the water in Flint during his visit.“We are hopeful the president will drink the water in Flint, to help reinforce Gov. Snyder’s actions and the EPA’s message that filtered Flint water is safe to drink,” Snyder spokeswoman Anna Heaton said in a statement to ABC.Despite the Environmental Protection Agency's assessment that filtered water is safe to drink, Flint residents continue to drink only bottled water, Heaton said. Last month, Snyder vowed to drink Flint's water for at least 30 days.In January, Obama addressed the water crisis in a visit to Detroit, saying he would be "beside" himself if his kids' health could be at risk. He declared a national emergency in Flint, directing funds to assist in relief efforts, following a request from Gov. Snyder.It is unclear if the governor will meet will meet with the president during his visit. Snyder is not currently scheduled to be in Flint, according to his office.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

FBI Arrest Man in Abduction and Death of 11-Year-Old Girl Kidnapped from Navajo


New Mexico State Police(SHIPROCK, N.M.) -- A 27-year-old man has been arrested in the abduction and death of an 11-year-old girl believed to have been kidnapped from the Navajo Nation in New Mexico, the FBI announced Tuesday evening.The Albuquerque office of the FBI tweeted its arrest of Tom Begaye, 27, of Waterflow, New Mexico, for the "abduction and death" of Ashlynne Mike, who went missing Monday and was found dead Tuesday.Begaye is slated to appear in court Wednesday, according to the FBI's tweet. It was unknown if he had a lawyer yet.#FBI announces Tom Begaye, 27, of Waterflow, N.M., arrested in abduction and death of 11-year-old Ashlynne Mike. Court appearance tomorrow.— FBI Albuquerque (@FBIAlbuquerque) May 4, 2016Ashlynne Mike was last seen Monday around 4 p.m., according to a press release from New Mexico State Police. "An unknown Native American male is believed to have abducted Ashlynn[e]," read the press release. "[The] abductor was last seen in the area of Navajo Route 36 Mile Post 13 at 4 p.m."Her parents filed a police report Monday night after Ashlynne and her 9-year-old brother, Ian, went missing, Najavo Nation Public Information Officer Mihio Manus said.Shortly after the report was filed, a motorist picked up Ian as he walked along the highway and took him to the Shiprock Police Department. Ian told police that a man had taken them toward the Shiprock Pinnacle, but he let Ian out when he came upon a dead end, Manus said. The man then continued on with Ashlynne.The man later returned without Ashlynne and told Ian to "go home," Manus said.Ashlynne's body was found Tuesday in Shiprock, according to FBI Public Affairs Specialist Frank Fisher.The FBI described the man suspected of abducting her as a light-skinned Navajo man in his 20s or 30s with short, dark hair. The man has a tear-drop tattoo under his left eye, according to the FBI, and was last seen wearing earrings in both ears, a long, silver chain necklace, gold watch, with a black shirt and blue pants.The vehicle used in the alleged abduction was a maroon minivan with sliding doors with a luggage rack on the top and no hub caps on the wheels, the FBI said.“We want to reassure the family that the Navajo Nation Police are conducting a thorough investigation in this case and will be working with the FBI to apprehend the abductor and bring him to justice,” said Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Three Dead After Small Plane Crashes on Long Island


WABC-TV(SYOSSET, N.Y.) -- A pilot and two passengers are dead after a small plane en route from South Carolina to Connecticut crashed on Long Island, officials say.According to Nassau County Police, the plane came down in Syosset at 3:45 p.m. Tuesday after suffering “an unknown problem." Despite the large debris field, which is near several schools, there were no injuries on the ground.The Federal Aviation Administration said the Beech BE35 aircraft crashed on Cold Spring Road in Syosset as it was heading to Robertson Field in Plainville, Connecticut, from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the incident.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

11-Year-Old Girl Kidnapped from Navajo Nation Found Dead


New Mexico State Police(SHIPROCK, N.M.) -- An 11-year-old girl believed to have been kidnapped from the Navajo Nation in New Mexico was found dead Tuesday, according to the FBI.Ashlynne Mike was last seen Monday around 4 p.m., according to a press release from New Mexico State Police. "An unknown Native American male is believed to have abducted Ashlynn[e]," read the press release. "[The] abductor was last seen in the area of Navajo Route 36 Mile Post 13 at 4 p.m."Her parents filed a police report Monday night after Ashlynne and her 9-year-old brother, Ian, went missing, Najavo Nation Public Information Officer Mihio Manus said.Shortly after the report was filed, a motorist picked up Ian as he walked along the highway and took him to the Shiprock Police Department. Ian told police that a man had taken them toward the Shiprock Pinnacle, but he let Ian out when he came upon a dead end, Manus said. The man then continued on with Ashlynne.The man later returned without Ashlynne and told Ian to "go home," Manus said.Ashlynne's body was found Tuesday in Shiprock, according to FBI Public Affairs Specialist Frank Fisher.The FBI described the man suspected of abducting her as a light-skinned Navajo man in his 20s or 30s with short, dark hair. The man has a tear-drop tattoo under his left eye, according to the FBI, and was last seen wearing earrings in both ears, a long, silver chain necklace, gold watch, with a black shirt and blue pants.The vehicle used in the alleged abduction was a maroon minivan with sliding doors with a luggage rack on the top and no hub caps on the wheels, the FBI said.“We want to reassure the family that the Navajo Nation Police are conducting a thorough investigation in this case and will be working with the FBI to apprehend the abductor and bring him to justice,” said Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Detroit Teacher Explains What's at Stake Amid District 'Sick Out'


iStock/Thinkstock(DETROIT) -- Detroit teachers are taking to the streets instead of classrooms for the second day of a "sick out" rally in a fight for paychecks.Kendra Lincourt, an art teacher who has worked at Detroit Public Schools for 17 years, participated in the rallies, both on Monday and Tuesday."People need to realize that teachers are not going to work without being paid," Lincourt told ABC News Tuesday. "I love my job. I want to continue to do my job, but I'm not going to do it for free. I have a family I need to support."Lincourt said her husband is also a teacher but not with Detroit public schools."We're not trying to be selfish by any means," she said. "It's our passion, but it's also our job, it's how we live. We're not asking for anything that we don't deserve."On Tuesday, 94 of 97 schools in the Detroit Public School district were closed, impacting 45,726 students, according to school officials.A spokeswoman for the district said the three remaining schools had enough teachers report to work. The district closed schools where 40 percent or more of the teaching staff called in sick, the spokeswoman said.Monday's "sick out" also closed 94 schools, impacting 45,628 students. The sick out is ongoing "because we still don't have assurance that we're going to be paid," Detroit Federation of Teachers interim President Ivy Bailey told ABC News Tuesday."We were hoping yesterday would be the last day," Bailey said, adding that teachers were telling her they miss their students.Lincourt said it's unfortunate that the school closures are causing last-minute child care problems for parents."We do feel for the parents," she said. "At our school we're fortunate that we have a lot of parental support. They understand that nobody is going to work without being paid"And as for her own three daughters, who attend the school where she teachers, they went along to the rallies, Lincourt said. While her children are missing class time, Lincourt said the rallies provided "amazing connections." She said one daughter, a 4th-grader, likened marching down the middle of a Detroit road to her studies about Martin Luther King.When the "sick out" began Monday, Bailey explained to ABC News the reason behind it. Because teachers do not get paid during the summer, some teachers are on 26 pay periods. "They take their salary and they pro-rate it throughout the year [with] additional pay periods in the summer, so they can get paid over the summer," she said.She explained that the state gave the district $48.7 million to get through the rest of the school year but that did not include money to cover summer payments."When we figured out what was going on and looked at the payments of those teachers, technically Thursday of last week is the last day that they're actually being paid," Bailey said."In theory, they're working without pay," she said. "There's no guarantee -- based on what the district has told us -- that they will receive payment after June 30, which is not fair. No one should work for free."In Detroit, where the economy has been struggling for years, schools are currently under a state of financial emergency and are run by an emergency manager instead of a school board and superintendent."If you are an emergency manager and you're supposed to be the person who came here to straighten out our finances, and now they're worse than they ever were ... I believe we have every right to be upset. And there is no accountability for what has gone on with these emergency mangers," she said."The teachers feel, and I feel, that no one is listening to us," Bailey said. "The teachers are not only fighting for themselves, but more importantly, they're fighting for their students."Mechelle Doty, a school psychologist for the district, told ABC News Tuesday that staff members "would like nothing better than being able to serve the students. But we just want what's fair.""Anyone in any work place ... expects compensation," she said. "We have bills, we have families, we have responsibilities just like anyone else who has a job. We're just really asking for fairness and what's due."Doty said she's not sure if she'll go back to school Wednesday."It's a day-to-day approach," she said. "We are showing what our concerns are and we're waiting for a response. And we're really waiting to see if the funding that is necessary for the education of the district, if that's going to be approved."Tuesday also happens to be National Teacher Appreciation Day, a part of Teacher Appreciation Week. Bailey said the timing is a coincidence."I did tell teachers 'Happy Appreciation Day,'" Bailey said. "It's kind of ironic."Detroit Public Schools DPS Transition Manager Steven Rhodes did not immediately issue a statement on the second day of the "sick out," but he said Monday, "I am on record as saying that I cannot in good conscience ask anyone to work without pay." "Nevertheless, it breaks my heart to think about the major impact that the closure of 94 of the district’s 97 schools is having on our students and their families," Rhodes said Monday, also noting that "families were forced to try to find a way to unexpectedly care for their students" and "many parents may have been forced to take a day off from work without pay." He also mentioned that some students rely on school for meals."Apart from the toll this is taking on our students and their families, of closing 94 schools, District funding will also be impacted -- at a time when we can least afford it," he said. "Today’s school closure action encouraged by the DFT may cost the District approximately $2 million in state aid. That amount of funding equates to the cost of hiring roughly 20 teachers. The loss of these funds also does nothing to help the district address the serious issues that we have all been working to address, including teacher/student ratios and smaller class sizes, as well as improving the quality of the learning environment in our schools."Rhodes said he "can make no guarantees, but it is clear that the Michigan Legislature understands the urgency of this situation and will act in a timely manner to ensure that operations of the school district continues uninterrupted."He said he will continue to work with Lansing policy makers to "help them understand how critical the passage of the legislation before them is not only to the future of Detroit Public Schools, but also to the future of the city of Detroit.""Without this legislation, Detroit Public Schools will not be able to operate after June 30, 2016," Rhodes said.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Connecticut Legislature Passes Gun Control Bill Aimed at Protecting Victims of D


Stockbyte/Thinkstock(HARTFORD, Conn.) -- Victims of domestic violence in Connecticut will receive additional protections with the passing of a bill aimed at prohibiting those who are subject to a temporary restraining order from possessing firearms, thus eliminating a critical window of time during which a victim’s life could be at risk. The bill heads to the governor’s desk in the coming days for his signature before it becomes state law.The bill passed in the Connecticut General Assembly -- the House passing its version of the bill last week, the Senate approving it Monday -- the latest action to strengthening gun laws following the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.Gov. Dannel Malloy, who introduced the bill in February this year, said the bill is vital for the safety of domestic violence victims."We have a moral obligation to work to prevent needless tragedy and to make this the law,” he said in a statement Monday. “Women in abusive relationships are five times more likely to be killed if their abuser has access to a firearm. When an instance of domestic violence rises to the point that a temporary restraining order is needed, we must do everything we can to prevent tragedy. Now, Connecticut will take a commonsense step towards strengthening and enhancing our gun violence protection laws.”Under current state law, only those with permanent restraining orders are prohibited from firearm possession. Those with temporary restraining orders must attend a hearing with a judge before a full restraining order can be granted -- this process often taking several weeks during which a victim’s life could be at risk, according to supporters of the bill.The new bill will require the subject of the temporary order to turn in their firearm to police within 24 hours. The bill also requires a hearing on a full order to take place within seven days to usher along the process in a timely fashion, instead of the two week time allotment.It's a bill federal lawmakers are also trying to mirror and propel across a national level. Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Connecticut, who's working on legislation of his own in the U.S. Senate, told ABC News that Congress needs to act, and fast.“Congress must follow Connecticut’s lead and end its complicity with domestic violence gun deaths by passing national legislation prohibiting domestic abusers from having firearms. My measure would save lives by preventing domestic abusers across the country from purchasing or possessing guns," Blumenthal said. "Abusers are often at the height of their rage after being served with a temporary restraining order, and this new Connecticut law removes deadly weapons from their hands before they can cause irreversible harm. The link between guns and domestic violence is a deadly one. We must act quickly. Lives are literally on the line.”Connecticut’s other Democratic senator, Chris Murphy, a co-sponsor of Blumenthal's bill, faults Congress for its inaction.“I’m glad Connecticut is continuing to lead the nation in preventing dangerous people from buying guns. I see absolutely no reason why anyone would stand up and argue that a domestic abuser under a under a court-ordered temporary restraining order should be able to walk out of a store with a gun,” he said. “If Congress continues to fail to expand background checks and keep deadly weapons out of the hands of domestic abusers, more lives will be lost. And that will be on us.”The state bill has earned applause from the White House and also former congresswoman and gun violence survivor Gabby Giffords.“I applaud Connecticut’s leaders who stood up for common sense and voted for this responsible bill that will make it harder for abusers to get their hands on guns,” she said in a statement posted online.According to Giffords’ organization, Americans for Responsible Solutions, women in the U.S. are 11 times more likely to be murdered with a gun than women in other developed countries. And more than than half of all murders of American women are committed with a gun, according to the group, which also noted that abused women are also five times more likely to be killed if their abuser has access to a firearm.But critics of gun control, including the Connecticut Citizens Defense League, say the bill violates due process rights for gun owners. CCDL President Scott Wilson posted his own statement online saying the bill eliminates the protections affirmed under the Fifth and 14th Amendments of the U.S. Constitution.“We feel it is important for the public to understand that individuals who may be served with an order of this type do not even have to be charged with any crime, let alone convicted of wrong-doing,” Wilson said. “It’s very unfortunate that proponents of this bill that hold office and have sworn to uphold our constitution are working hand in hand with groups that are specifically misleading the public.”Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

High School French Teacher Doesn't Speak French


Courtesy Nathaniel White(HOUSTON) -- "Non, je ne parle pas Français," is what one substitute high school teacher in Texas might say to his students -- though he is supposed to be teaching them French language.When Energy Institute High School in Houston, Texas parted ways with their staff French teacher in December, they didn't have another teacher qualified to teach the language. They had to hire someone to run the class on short notice and the school district sent them a substitute who does not speak, let alone teach, French language.The former teacher of the class, Jean Cius, said his students were doing well in French before he left the school. Although he doesn't believe it's the new teacher's fault that he doesn't know French, he doesn't believe he's a good fit for teaching the class.“If you are a long-term sub, you have to be knowledgeable of the subject," he said. "You can’t be a sub for longer than two or three months and not be knowledgeable.”But the substitute now in charge of the class, Albert Moyer, defends his position saying he has to be flexible. In a personal blog post, Moyer added that because he is an associate teacher he is not required to be certified in the subject.“My job is to be as qualified as I can in an emergency wherever I am placed," he wrote in the post. "I have had numerous assignments in all subjects.”Nathaniel White is a student in Moyer’s class and said he likes him as a teacher, but the class works on fill in the blank worksheets in order to learn the material.White’s mother, Sharonda White, said she doesn't blame Moyer, but her Nathaniel is not learning the foreign language like he should be. She believes the school should be doing more to help the situation.“It’s not his fault that he’s there. The school should do a better job at finding someone who is qualified.”Jason Spencer of Houston Independent School District (HISD)said the school has been trying to find a qualified instructor but there is a shallow pool of candidates.“It can often become a difficult task to find certified foreign language teachers, in the middle of the academic school year, to fill the needs of the district. Effective French teachers are especially hard to come by," officials from the HISD said in a statement. "The district continues its efforts to hire talented foreign language teachers to instruct HISD students. HISD strives to ensure all students have access to an education that will help ensure they are successful academically and ready to complete in a global economWith one month left in the school year, Spencer says Moyer will still be in charge of the school’s French class unless a permanent replacement is found.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Suspect Hijacks Bus, Striking and Killing Pedestrian in DC


iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A suspect hijacked a Washington, D.C., bus Tuesday morning and hit and killed a pedestrian, the D.C. police department said.Police say the suspect assaulted the bus driver and stole the bus before hitting a pedestrian in a gas station lot.The suspect is in custody.The bus operator suffered non-life-threatening injuries, according to Metro Transit Police. No passengers were injured.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Suspect in Custody After 'Bus-Jacking' in Washington, DC


iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A suspect is in custody after a bus-jacking in Washington, D.C., Tuesday morning, the D.C. police department said.Additional details were not immediately available.Story developing...Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

NTSB Reveals Probable Cause of Fatal Metro Accident, Alarming Operational Errors


iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — A “disturbing” attitude towards safety contributed to the track fire that killed one passenger and injured 91 more in Washington, D.C.’s metro system in January 2015, National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Christopher Hart said Tuesday.Following an electrical arcing incident on the yellow line’s high-voltage third rail, hundreds of riders were trapped underground in a dark, smoky train for nearly an hour, many unable to pry open the doors.As a voice on the loudspeaker urged passengers to “remain calm,” survivors say many were coughing, choking and crying.Numerous issues -- including an ineffectively deployed ventilation system and poor communication with first responders -- intensified the situation, officials from the NTSB explained Tuesday.A 61-year-old mother died of respiratory failure, and scores more suffered from smoke inhalation, authorities said.”Safety is still not institutionalized as a core value at WMATA,” Hart said, referring to the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority.The NTSB's criticism didn't stop with metro. Officials also lambasted the "uniquely dysfunctional" tri-state oversight committee, and noted that the DC Fire Department and EMS had not practiced a full-scale tunnel evacuation for five years before the fatal accident at L'Enfant Plaza.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Wife of DEA Employee Dies After Drive-By Shooting


DEA(LAKE DELTON, Wis.) — The wife of a federal employee has died after a gunman shot her in the neck while she was in her car with her family, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).The victim was identified as 44-year-old Tracy Czaczkowski of Buffalo Grove, Illinois. Her husband has been a DEA employee for 11 years."Tracy is a loving wife of 15 years, mother of two tender age children, daughter and friend," the DEA said in a statement. "The family is asking for privacy in this difficult time so that they can comfort each other. The family would like to say thank you for the prayers and out pouring of support for Tracy."Dane County Sheriff David Mahoney called the shooting "a random act." There is no suspected link to husband’s employment with DEA, a DEA spokesman confirmed to ABC News. The gunman, who was later shot by law enforcement, is in police custody.The incident happened Sunday afternoon on Interstate 90/94 as Czaczkowski, her husband and their two children were driving home to Illinois from the Wisconsin Dells area.They were passing a Chevrolet Blazer when the Blazer driver rolled down his window and fired three rounds at their car, the Sauk County Sheriff's Office said.It was the second round that went into the passenger window and hit Czaczkowski's neck. The sheriff's office said Czaczkowski's husband and children were not injured.Meanwhile, the gunman -- with his two brothers as passengers -- kept driving. The Dane County Sheriff's Office said another car was also struck by gunfire but the driver wasn't injured.Witnesses called 911 and officers pursued the gunman's car, deploying road spikes to stop it. The suspect then got out of the car and walked toward the officers armed with a revolver, the sheriff's office said. After ignoring commands to stop, the suspect was shot by officers, according to police.The sheriff's office said the alleged gunman is also the suspect in a murder at an apartment building in West Allis, Wisconsin, that occurred on the morning of the shooting.The suspect, identified as 20-year-old Zachary Hays of West Allis, remains in a local hospital, officials said. "Multiple counties, including Milwaukee, Columbia, Sauk, and Dane are continuing to investigate collaboratively to determine what charges will be referred to the respective District Attorneys," the Dane County Sheriff's Office said.One of Hays' brothers, 30-year-old Jeremy Hays, is being held on a tentative charge of felon in possession of a firearm, the sheriff's office said. The identity of the other brother was not released.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Illinois Mother of Two Critically Injured in Drive-by Shooting


iStock/Thinkstock(LAKE DELTON, Wis.) — A mother is in critical condition after a gunman shot her in the neck while she was in her car with her husband and two children in Wisconsin.Dane County Sheriff David Mahoney called it "a random act." The gunman, who was later shot by law enforcement, is in police custody.The shooting happened Sunday afternoon on Interstate 90/94 as the victim, her husband and their two children were driving home to Illinois from the Wisconsin Dells area.They were passing a Chevrolet Blazer when the Blazer driver rolled down his window and fired three rounds at their car, the Sauk County Sheriff's Office said.It was the second round that went into the passenger window and hit the victim's neck. Meanwhile, the gunman -- with his two brothers as passengers -- kept driving. The Dane County Sheriff's Office says another car was also struck by gunfire but the driver wasn't injured.Chief Deputy Jeff Spencer told ABC News that the mother, 44, was hospitalized in critical condition. Spencer did not know the ages of the children. The sheriff's office said the man and the children were not injured. The mother's identity has not been released by the sheriff's office.Witnesses called 911 and officers pursued the gunman's car, deploying road spikes to stop it. The suspect then got out of the car and walked toward the officers armed with a revolver, the sheriff's office said. After ignoring commands to stop, the suspect was shot by officers, according to police.The sheriff's office says the suspected gunman, a 22-year-old from West Allis, Wisconsin, is also the suspect in a murder at an apartment building in West Allis the morning of the drive-by shooting.The gunman, whose identity was not released, is being treated at a local hospital and is in the custody of the Dane County Sheriff’s Office.The gunman's brothers are being held at the Dane County Jail, the sheriff's office said.The shooting remains under investigation. Anyone who saw the shooting is asked to call the Dane County tip line at 608-284-6900.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

FBI Searches Home of Reputed Mobster Suspected in Boston Art Heist


Google(BOSTON) — The search for missing art stolen more than two decades ago from Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum has taken FBI agents to six continents around the world. But the most active lead seems to be in the backyard of an aging mobster in a small town in Connecticut.Boston FBI field office spokeswoman Kristen Setera confirmed to ABC News that the “FBI is conducting court-authorized activity at 69 Frances Drive in Manchester, [Connecticut], in connection with an ongoing federal investigation,” but declined to comment further.It is the third time the FBI has executed search warrants in and around that particular ranch house, the home of Robert “Bobby the Cook” Gentile, who is currently serving a 2-and-a-half-year federal sentence on unrelated drug and gun charges that came with his 2015 arrest by the FBI.Gentile, who pleaded guilty to gun and drug charges, has repeatedly denied any connection to the stolen art and once famously muttered in court that his involvement in the heist was “lies, lies, all lies.” His lawyer, Rome McGuigan, told ABC News that his client knows nothing."He laughed and he couldn’t believe they were, that they were at his house again, and he said, this is a quote, ‘They ain’t gonna find nuttin,’" McGuigan said.Among the stolen pieces were three Rembrandts, including his only seascape, "Storm on the Sea of Galilee," along with one of only 31 known works by Vermeer, "The Concert."In a court filing obtained by ABC News, McGuigan alleged that the government was using the drug and gun charges as a way to force his client to produce the Gardner Museum paintings. He also said that the government had used informants to prod him into “talking about the paintings.”Assistant U.S. Attorney John Durham acknowledged in a separate court filing that the FBI "tasked" a mob informant "to go see Gentile and engage him in general conversation” in 2010. The informant was instructed to "pay particular attention to anything Gentile might say about the Gardner Museum theft, but not to initiate any conversation on that topic."According to Durham, Gentile failed a lie detector test administered by the FBI when asked questions including: “Did you know those paintings would be stolen before it happened?”; “Did you ever have any of those stolen paintings in your possession?”; and “Do know the current location of any of those paintings?”Gentile answered no to each question but “the results of the polygraph,” the government claimed in the filing, established he “was not being truthful” about the 13 paintings stolen from the Gardner Museum in March 1990. The infamous heist remains unsolved.Anthony Amore, the security director for the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, referred all questions about Monday’s activities to the FBI. It remains unclear what was recovered, if anything, in Monday's search.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

City in New York Declares State of Emergency Due to Contaminated Water


iStock/Thinkstock(NEWBURGH, N.Y.) — A State of Emergency was declared in a small town in the metropolitan area of New York Monday due to the discovery of contaminated water.City officials in Newburgh -- with a population of roughly 30,000, is located about 60 miles north of New York City on the Hudson River -- detected elevated levels of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS), a key ingredient found in Scotchgard and numerous stain repellents.The New York State Department of Conservation and The Department of Health have recommended that steps be taken to reduce or eliminate the compound from the city's water system, according to a statement released by City Manager Michael Ciaravino.Officials are asking people to conserve usage while the city draws water from other local resources for the time being.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Detroit School Teachers Plan to Continue 'Sick Out' for Second Day


iStock/Thinkstock(DETROIT) -- Detroit Public School teachers are fighting for their paychecks by continuing a "sick out" that started Monday and closed over 90 of the 105 public schools in the city."The teachers feel, and I feel, that no one is listening to us when we try to explain what's going on here. I feel like we're being held hostage by our legislatures," Detroit Federation of Teachers interim president Ivy Bailey told ABC News Monday. "The teachers are not only fighting for themselves, but more importantly, they're fighting for their students.""We have teachers who are on 26 pay periods," Bailey explained. "What happens is they take their salary and they pro-rate it throughout the year [with] additional pay periods in the summer, so they can get paid over the summer -- because teachers do not get paid in the summer."She explained that the state gave the district $48.7 million to get through the rest of the school year but that did not include money to cover summer payments."When we figured out what was going on and looked at the payments of those teachers, technically Thursday of last week is the last day that they're actually being paid," Bailey said."In theory, they're working without pay," she said. "There's no guarantee -- based on what the district has told us -- that they will receive payment after June 30, which is not fair. No one should work for free. And so rightfully so, we're all upset about that."Bailey said when they asked if the money they received would include money for all employees who are on a 26 pay period, they were told "yes."She said this is not happening anywhere else in Michigan -- just Detroit, where the economy has been struggling for years.Detroit schools are currently under a state of financial emergency and are run by an emergency manager instead of a school board and superintendent."I'm hoping today will accomplish an awareness across the city of Detroit -- what's happening to our schools systems is an atrocity," Bailey said. "If you are an emergency manager and you're supposed to be the person who came here to straighten out our finances, and now they're worse than they ever were ... I believe we have every right to be upset. And there is no accountability for what has gone on with these emergency mangers."Detroit Public Schools did not immediately provide a comment on Monday, but Transition Manager Judge Steven Rhodes said in a statement Sunday evening that the planned "sick out" would be "counterproductive and detrimental.""It is unfortunate that the DFT [Detroit Federation of Teachers] has chosen to make a statement in this way," Rhodes said."I am on record as saying that I cannot in good conscience ask anyone to work without pay. Wages that are owed to teachers should be paid. I understand the frustration and anger that our teachers feel," Rhodes said. "I am, however, confident that the legislature will support the request that will guarantee that teachers will receive the pay that is owed to them. The DFT's choice for a drastic call to action was not necessary.""I am confident that the Michigan Legislature understands the urgency of this situation and will act in a timely manner to ensure that operations of the school district continue uninterrupted," he said, adding that he's working with policy makers in Lansing "to move this legislation forward.""A district-wide sick out will be counterproductive and detrimental to the efforts of everyone working to help the District," he said. Rhodes said he hopes to continue his "strong relationship" with the Detroit Federation of Teachers "so that jointly we can achieve our mutual goal of creating a New DPS under local control that we can be proud of.”Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

New Video Shows Dramatic CSX Train Derailment in DC


ANDREW BIRAJ/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- New surveillance video released by the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority shows the moment 16 CSX train cars derailed in northeast Washington, D.C., Sunday morning.In the video, taken from a camera at WMATA’s Rhode Island Avenue metro stop, several cars appear to hurtle sideways off the tracks, creating a pileup near the station.No injuries were reported, and workers were able to plug a damaged car leaking sodium hydroxide, a chemical often used in detergents and other household products, and contain a separate ethanol leak, according to the Federal Railroad Administration.“CSX appreciates the continued support of D.C. first responders as safety remains the company's first priority,” the company said in a statement, adding that CSX is monitoring air quality to “confirm there are no adverse effects.”The company says it has re-railed 15 of the 16 derailed train cars, and plans to tow the final car away from the site.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Man Allegedly Attempts to Take Off with $260,000 Worth of Stolen Air Miles


Miami-Dade Police Department(MIAMI) -- A man identified as a former student in Miami, Florida, admitted to stealing over $260,000 worth of airline miles after he obtained personal information of several individuals across the country and used that information to gain access to their American Airlines AAdvantage accounts, according to court documents.According to an arrest affidavit, Milad Avazdavani, of Miami, admitted to police that he attempted to take over at least six individuals' American Airlines rewards accounts; he then attempted to redeem the miles to purchase trips to Dubai and Fort Lauderdale in addition to renting sports cars.The alleged thefts mentioned in the affidavit took place between December 2014 and February 2015, according to the affidavit. Miami-Dade Police arrested Avazdavani in March of 2015.Avazdavani, who is in jail awaiting trial, spoke publicly for the first time in an interview with the Miami Herald published Sunday, insisting he is not stupid enough to use stolen miles to book trips in his own name.Avazdavani told the Herald he was guilty only of “bargain shopping” for travel deals on the internet, while pointing the finger at "a third party."Police say Avazdavani admitted to obtaining the personal information of several individuals and using it to change the registered email addresses of their AAdvantage accounts.Police were alerted to the alleged identity theft after victims were asked by American Airlines to confirm the authenticity of the change on their accounts.After police searched Avazdavani's residence, police say they discovered credit cards belonging to other individuals and equipment designed to reprogram the magnetic strips of credit cards.“We encourage our AAdvantage members to contact us immediately if they believe their miles have been used fraudulently,” said American Airlines Spokesman Ross Feinstein. “In this specific case, we assisted law enforcement throughout their investigation. Our corporate security team spoke to each AAdvantage member that was impacted to ensure their mileage was reinstated.”The airline recommends that members use a strong password, monitor emails from American regarding account activity and keep a close eye on accounts.Police documents indicate Avazdavani has been charged with multiple felonies, including grand theft and unlawful possession of a credit card.The attorney listed for Avadzavani did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Taking a 'Gap Year'


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- First daughter Malia Obama has finally made her decision to attend Harvard University, but not until the fall of 2017. Between then and now, the 17-year-old will be taking a so-called gap year, an option that appears to be as popular as ever among U.S. high school students, even those with limited means.There’re no firm numbers on U.S. high school graduates who put off college for a year, but the American Gap Association has seen a 23 percent growth in enrollment for gap-year programs in the past year, the organization says.While the idea of going abroad for service work or even non-academic experiential learning closer to home might turn off some parents, there’s something to be said for building homes in Thailand or teaching children English in Spain, experts say.But there are also some key questions for families to keep in mind as students explore the possibility of taking off a year between high school and college.Here are some of them:How much will it cost?“I get a lot of parents calling me saying they saved for four years of college, not five,” executive director Ethan Knight of the American Gap Association told ABC News.But while these programs, not to be confused with studying abroad, can cost anywhere from $1,100 to $20,000, not including airfare, Knight said there are several scholarships and financial packages that can help relieve some of the financial burden.Some colleges also offer credit toward students’ gap years to keep them on track with their education and save money on classes, he added.Grace Milstein, 21, was able to afford a gap year to Israel from September 2012 to June 2013 with subsidies and grants that went toward her $20,000 program tag. Even though it was a big investment, she said of the time that included helping children with Down syndrome, it was “extremely beneficial,” and helped her focus more on her classes when she began attending New York’s Barnard College in fall 2013.Knight said the financial strain can actually help students learn more about budgeting, adding “it was one of the highest aspects students recorded learning from their experiences.”What if colleges make it difficult for students to take a gap year?Not all schools will allow students to defer their acceptance for a year, with some making students re-apply the next year when they will attend school. But more colleges are creating programs that work alongside gap years, according to Knight.Harvard University encourages students to take gap years and has between 80 and 110 students defer each year, the school says. So that was not a problem for Malia Obama, whatever she chooses to do.Will students want to attend college when they come back?“Parents fear that their children won’t want to go to college after being abroad for a year,” Knight said, adding that 90 percent of students who take a gap year go on to college.There may be other less-obvious benefits, as well.C. Hansell Bourdon, executive director of Carpe Mundi, a nonprofit that helps first-generation and low-income students take gap years, said, “Data is showing that it takes a student about six years to finish college. If you take a gap year, you actually finish sooner than the students that just go straight into school” because they usually have a clearer idea of their goals and plans after spending time abroad.“In a way it can save you money,” she said.Will it be a life-changing experience?“When you take a gap year it makes you realize there are other world views and perspectives,” Chris Mathy, 22, a senior at Stanford, told ABC News. “When you realize there’s this other perspective, it makes you question your own perspective.”It can even be more of a life-changing experience for men, who typically make up only 30 percent of the student population that takes a gap year, Knight, of the American Gap Association, said.“They develop more in that period of time than women do,” he said.Mathy agrees that he grew a lot as a person while taking a gap year in a small town in France, where he was the only man in the program. “I didn’t have American guys that I could hang out with, so I felt the need to go out of my way to meet more people,” he said.Milstein, the Barnard College junior, agreed that “living in another country does challenge you to step up and learn another culture. As long as you’re doing something out of your comfort zone, it will be enriching.”Milstein, who also took non-intensive elective courses in Israel based around her interests, knew she could not handle going to a competitive four-year college right after high school. “It was overwhelming,” she said.But Knight stressed that not taking a gap year shouldn’t be seen as a disadvantage. “If a student is genuinely excited for college, they should go to college,” he said.But, he added, college is “too much time and investment to go in if you don’t have a sense of purpose in it. College doesn’t immediately translate to getting a job.”In any scenario, whether college or the gap year, adversity is what will lead to the greatest change and development in a person, Knight said.“Pushing comfort zones is what makes it successful,” he added.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Lifesize Stonehenge Replica 'Foamhenge' Needs New Home


Mark Cline(NATURAL BRIDGE, Va.) -- On a historic plot of land in a small Virginia county rests a life-sized styrofoam replica of England’s most famous Stonehenge monument – “Foamhenge.”Mark Cline, who conceived the idea 20 years ago, built Foamhenge in time for its first appearance on April Fool’s Day in 2004. Despite visitors flocking to see it from all over the world, the attraction has overstayed its welcome in its current location.According to Cline, the Stonehenge replica rests on property that will become part of the Natural Bridge State Park."I am disappointed they don’t see the value of it, what it has done and what it can do," Cline said. "It’s been here 14 years, a lot longer than I thought it would be, so if it’s time for it to go I would like to see it go to a good home."Mark ClineIn the meantime, Cline is looking to donate the replica. But he says it must come down before Aug. 1, and the new owners will incur any costs involved in dismantling it and putting the foam pieces back up in a new location."Free isn’t free, I still have some say in the area that I think it will work best," Cline said. "I want it to go somewhere that the area can benefit from it."Mark ClineCline also has a second replica in Josephine, AL. He says Foamhenge was a business partnership between his company Enchanted Castle Studios and Natural Bridge State Park as a way to entice more tourists to the area.Natural Bridge is a registered historic landmark. The land was purchased by Thomas Jefferson from King George III of England in 1774.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Wisconsin Fishing Buds Reel in 60-Year-Old 6-Pack of Beer


Courtesy Adam Graves(NEW LONDON, Wisc.) -- Christian Burzynski, Adam Graves and Andy Holst have been fishing in Wisconsin's Wolf River for a very long time. Their fishing rods have brought in a whole lot of junk over the years, but one surprise catch last month is still making headlines."We were amazed to see that what we pulled up was a six-pack of Budweiser," Graves, 33, told ABC News. "We couldn't believe it when we pulled it up because it is such an usual find."The rusty cans show decades-old wear and tear of a rough time in deep waters. They weren't strong enough to hold their liquor, but the empty cans were weighed down with sand, and that made for a little extra effort to reel in the prized catch."All of us looked like, 'What the hell is that?'" Burzynski, 47, told ABC News. "It was kinda crazy to see these old cans. All six of the plastic rings were still intact.""We posted it to an outdoor news Facebook page called Grim Outdoors," Graves said. "It was shared over 1,000 times."All but one can was still attached to the bunch, Graves said. Also partially intact were their labels to reveal their brand. The fishermen say Budweiser officials estimate the cans are over 60 years old. Budweiser did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.Had the cans still been sealed, with the beer inside, Burzynski said he would have definitely raised a glass."I'm that type of guy who would say, 'Hey, let's go for it,' Burzynski said with a laugh.As for Graves, he said he wasn't so sure he would go for it, unless there was a bet on the table. "Maybe if money was involved," Graves joked.The men say they plan to keep the cans as a souvenir; something to show to their kids.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Colorado Supreme Court Rules Against Municipal Laws Limiting Fracking


iStock/Thinkstock(DENVER) -- The Colorado Supreme Court ruled Monday against two cities' attempts to limit fracking, saying the legislation passed by the cities of Longmont and Fort Collins are "invalid and unenforceable" because they conflict with existing state laws.In 2012, voters in the city of Longmont passed a ban on fracking, while in November 2013, Fort Collins voters passed a five-year moratorium on fracking to give the city time to study health and safety impacts of the process, according to court documents.The group that challenged Longmont and Fort Collins' rules against fracking, the Colorado Oil and Gas Association, called the court's ruling "a win" for the energy industry and the "people of Colorado who rely on affordable and dependable energy and a strong economy.""Nearly all wells in Colorado are hydraulically fractured, or fracked, meaning a ban on fracking is a ban on oil and gas development," COGA said in a statement Monday. "With this legal battle over, we look forward to working with Longmont, Fort Collins and other communities to find a balance that allows for responsible oil and gas development while respecting the rule of law and meeting the needs of local communities."Fort Collins city attorney Carrie Daggett said it will review the court's decision "carefully and fully to evaluate how it affects the City.""These issues are complex, and we’ll thoroughly examine the decisions relative to Fort Collins and Longmont," Daggett said. "However, it is clear that the Supreme Court has found that the Fort Collins moratorium on hydraulic fracturing is in operational conflict with Colorado law and is therefore preempted."Representatives for the City of Longmont or the City of Fort Collins did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Former Penn State Coach Jerry Sandusky Appears in Court to Appeal Child Sex Abus


iStock/Thinkstock(BELLEFONTE, Pa.) — Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky appeared in a Pennsylvania courtroom Monday as he appeals his child-sex abuse conviction.In 2012, Sandusky was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison for the sexual abuse of 10 boys, following tearful testimony from his victims.As officers led Sandusky into the courthouse Monday morning, the former coach, wearing an orange jumpsuit, told waiting reporters, "There’s much to say. For now, [defense attorney] Al Lindsay is gonna say it."Defense attorneys and prosecutors then presented their arguments in an hour-long hearing before Judge John Cleland in a Centre County, Pennsylvania courtroom, near the State College campus of Penn State University.Sandusky sat in the court as defense attorney Lindsay asked the judge for permission to question witnesses, including Sandusky's former lawyers, about the investigation and trial.Prosecutors argued that a new hearing shouldn’t be granted.It was not immediately clear when the judge would make his decision.If his sentence stands, Sandusky, now 72, would be 98 at his earliest possible release date.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Federal Judge Orders Woman to Unlock iPhone Using Her Fingerprint


iStock/Thinkstock(GLENDALE, Calif.) -- The case of a California woman who was ordered to unlock an iPhone using her fingerprint is raising questions about whether compelling a person to unlock their smartphone could infringe on their right against self-incrimination.A warrant was issued in February ordering Paytsar Bkhchadzhyan to unlock an iPhone seized from a Glendale, California, residence. She later pleaded no contest to a felony count of identity theft, according to the Los Angeles Times.While much of the public discussion over encryption has focused on four to six digit passcodes, the California case is raising the question of whether a person's biometric markers -- such as a fingerprint or iris -- could be used to help authorities crack into a device.Mark Bartholomew, a law professor at the University of Buffalo who studies encryption and cyber law, told ABC News "the law is very uncertain on this because it hasn't caught up to technology."At issue is whether pressing a finger to unlock a phone and giving law enforcement access to all of its contents is tantamount to testifying without ever speaking a word."It's one of those things like always technology is way ahead of the law," Bartholomew said. "These issues of passwords, biometric safeguards, at the same time law enforcement wants them, over time these are going to be teed up for the courts and Supreme Court to weigh in on it."But Albert Gidari, the director of privacy at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, told the LA Times that the action might not violate the 5th Amendment prohibition of self-incrimination."Unlike disclosing passcodes, you are not compelled to speak or say what's 'in your mind' to law enforcement," Gidari told the LA Times. "'Put your finger here' is not testimonial or self-incriminating."Apple first added Touch ID to the iPhone 5s and has since included the security measure in all of its recent iPhones and iPads. Built into the home button, Touch ID can also be bypassed using passcodes.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Over 90 Detroit Schools Close as Teachers Hold 'Sick Out'


iStock/Thinkstock(DETROIT) -- Detroit Public School teachers are fighting for their paychecks by initiating a "sick out" Monday that has closed over 90 of the 105 public schools in the city."The teachers feel, and I feel, that no one is listening to us when we try to explain what's going on here. I feel like we're being held hostage by our legislatures," Detroit Federation of Teachers interim president Ivy Bailey told ABC News Monday. "The teachers are not only fighting for themselves, but more importantly, they're fighting for their students.""We have teachers who are on 26 pay periods," Bailey explained. "What happens is they take their salary and they pro-rate it throughout the year [with] additional pay periods in the summer, so they can get paid over the summer -- because teachers do not get paid in the summer."She explained that the state gave the district $48.7 million to get through the rest of the school year but that did not include money to cover summer payments."When we figured out what was going on and looked at the payments of those teachers, technically Thursday of last week is the last day that they're actually being paid," Bailey said."In theory, they're working without pay," she said. "There's no guarantee -- based on what the district has told us -- that they will receive payment after June 30, which is not fair. No one should work for free. And so rightfully so, we're all upset about that."Bailey said when they asked if the money they received would include money for all employees who are on a 26 pay period, they were told "yes."She said this is not happening anywhere else in Michigan -- just Detroit, where the economy has been struggling for years.Detroit schools are currently under a state of financial emergency and are run by an emergency manager instead of a school board and superintendent."I'm hoping today will accomplish an awareness across the city of Detroit -- what's happening to our schools systems is an atrocity," Bailey said. "If you are an emergency manager and you're supposed to be the person who came here to straighten out our finances, and now they're worse than they ever were ... I believe we have every right to be upset. And there is no accountability for what has gone on with these emergency mangers."Detroit Public Schools did not immediately provide a comment on Monday, but Transition Manager Judge Steven Rhodes said in a statement Sunday evening that the planned "sick out" would be "counterproductive and detrimental.""It is unfortunate that the DFT [Detroit Federation of Teachers] has chosen to make a statement in this way," Rhodes said."I am on record as saying that I cannot in good conscience ask anyone to work without pay. Wages that are owed to teachers should be paid. I understand the frustration and anger that our teachers feel," Rhodes said. "I am, however, confident that the legislature will support the request that will guarantee that teachers will receive the pay that is owed to them. The DFT's choice for a drastic call to action was not necessary.""I am confident that the Michigan Legislature understands the urgency of this situation and will act in a timely manner to ensure that operations of the school district continue uninterrupted," he said, adding that he's working with policy makers in Lansing "to move this legislation forward.""A district-wide sick out will be counterproductive and detrimental to the efforts of everyone working to help the District," he said. Rhodes said he hopes to continue his "strong relationship" with the Detroit Federation of Teachers "so that jointly we can achieve our mutual goal of creating a New DPS under local control that we can be proud of.”Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Florida Woman Allegedly Chases Convicted Voyeur Out of Target Store


Target(YULEE, Fla.) — A Florida woman turned the tables on man with a prior conviction for preying on women in public places, catching an alleged encounter on camera.Candice Spivey says the man, whom police identified as Jeffery Polizzi, had approached her two years ago, asking her what she described as inappropriate questions. But Spivey recognized the man this time, quickly thinking to record a video on her phone as she chased the suspect out of a Target store.“Do you remember running into me in the grocery store?” Spivey of Yulee, Florida, asks Polizzi in the video.“Call the cops,” she shouts as the man begins to run away from her.Spivey was shopping in the bikini section of her local Target April 26 when she says Polizzi approached her.“You want to make sure it’s not too sheer or clear,” the man can be heard saying in the video.She claims the same man harassed her two years ago inside a Publix supermarket as he was secretly filming their encounter.But she said her reaction was different this time.“I wanted an identification on who he was so I could put this out there,” Spivey said of her video.Spivey posted the video to her Facebook page, where it now has a whopping 1.6 million views, with dozens of women saying Polizzi, 31, did the same thing to them.Police eventually caught Polizzi, charging him with reckless driving after he allegedly fled the scene. It's unclear whether he has entered a plea or has a lawyer. Polizzi has not responded to ABC News’ request for comment.It’s not the first time he has been accused of inappropriate retail encounters. Polizzi was previously convicted of “taking photographs of women in dressing rooms” in 2009, according to court documents.Spivey says she has no regrets about her actions.“If that is what you have to do to be safe and protect yourself, you do what you got to do,” she said.The Nassau County Sheriff’s Office is asking anyone who has had suspicious encounters with Polizzi to come forward.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.