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High Winds Cause NH Circus Tent to Collapse, 2 Dead


iStock/Thinkstock(LANCASTER, N.H.) -- A deadly circus tent collapse for a New Hampshire fairground.A circus tent collapsed at the Lancaster, New Hampshire fairgrounds on Monday night killing two and seriously injuring 15. Around 250 people were inside the tent during the time of the collapse.After reports for severe thunderstorms in the area, high winds reportedly knocked over the tent during a circus performance.New Hampshire Department of Safety Public Information Officer Mike Todd said the Emergency Operations Center had been activated, no one was trapped at the moment, and local authorities were on the scene.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

NY Air Guard Unit is Lifeline for Scientists in Greenland and Antarctica


Angel Canales/ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Every year, a group of airmen from the New York Air National Guard embark on a unique mission to support science.Since the mid-1970’s the 109th Airlift Wing has supported scientists logistically from around the world and brought them to remote locations in Greenland and Antarctica to conduct climate change research.All of this is possible with a very special aircraft, the Lockheed LC-130, the largest plane in the world, which can land in snow and ice because it is equipped with skis.Lt. Col Steve Yandik, a pilot and member of the unit for 25 years, said his group is the lifeline for scientists to conduct their research, bringing fuel, supplies and the scientists themselves to remote areas.“The 109th's mission is different in the fact that we're not being shot," he said. "We’re not in combat but the enemies we are facing here are Mother Nature, weather and extreme cold temperatures."The mission of the unit, based in Scotia, NY, is to support researchers from the National Science Foundation, an independent, federally-funded organization, in its projects in Greenland and the Antarctic.In the Antarctic, researchers focus on astrophysics, biology, climate change, marine science and glaciology. In Greenland, researchers are looking at carbon emissions present in glacial ice.Almost all the areas where the National Science Foundation conducts research are somewhat difficult to access.In many cases the work could not be carried out without the air support provided by the ski-equipped planes the 109th flies, said Peter West from the National Science Foundation.The unit can travel between 600 to 1,000 hours during a typical season in Greenland and can transport up to 2.5 million pounds of cargo that are essential to conduct the research.“I like the challenge of flying on the snow," Yandik said. "I like the fact that actually there's some good coming out of it.”Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Memphis Cop Killing: Suspected Gunman in Custody


iStock/Thinkstock(MEMPHIS, Tenn.) -- The man who is accused of killing a cop in Memphis this weekend is now in custody according to the Shelby County Sheriff.Here is a closer look at how the original incident unfolded:THE TRAFFIC STOP:Saturday night, Memphis police officer Sean Bolton saw an illegally parked 2002 Mercedes-Benz, police said.Bolton pulled in front of the car and shined his spotlight inside.Bolton then went up to the car, where he engaged in a "brief struggle" with the car's passenger, according to police.THE SHOOTING:The passenger, identified as Wilbourn, allegedly shot Bolton several times, police said. Wilbourn and the car's driver fled after the shooting.When officers responded to the scene and searched the suspect's car, they determined "Bolton apparently interrupted some sort of drug transaction," police said.Officers found digital scales and a bag containing 1.7 grams of marijuana in the car, police said.The car's driver later turned himself in, police said, and was released without charges.THE OFFICER:Bolton, 33, was taken to a hospital in critical condition. He was later declared dead, police said.Bolton had been a member of the Memphis Police Department since 2010. Bolton was also a Marine veteran who had served a tour in Iraq, police said."To lose a loved one or a family member is a horrific event," Memphis police director Toney Armstrong said.Armstrong added, "We lost not only an officer, but a great man, a dedicated servant to our community, and a family member."THE MANHUNT:Wilbourn is still at-large on Monday, Memphis police told ABC News.A murder warrant has been issued for his arrest, police said.Police said Wilbourn is out on supervised release after being sentenced to 10 years for bank robbery.Wilbourn is considered to be armed and dangerous, police said. A $10,000 reward has been announced for his arrest.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

James Holmes Trial to Move into Next Sentencing Phase


ABC News(CENTENNIAL, Colo.) -- The jury in the sentencing phase of the James Holmes murder trial decided Monday that aggravating factors outweigh mitigating factors.This means the sentencing phase of the trial will continue and the death penalty remains on the table.Last month, Holmes was convicted of killing 12 people and wounding 70 others at a midnight screening of The Dark Knight Rises in Aurora, Colorado on July 20, 2012.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Feds Unite Agents to Fight Baltimore's Record Slayings


iStock/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) -- Federal agents have joined with Baltimore police as part of a wide-reaching effort to curb the recent violence that one expert says appears to be modeled on Los Angeles’ response to the 1992 riots.The effort, launched on Monday, involves personnel from the FBI, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the U.S. Marshals Service and the Secret Service, with two agents from each agency directly embedding with the Baltimore police department’s homicide unit, acting police commissioner Kevin Davis said on Sunday.The collaboration, which Davis dubbed “B-Fed,” comes after two people were fatally shot in Baltimore in the first two days of August, on top of the dozens of killings that took place in the city in July.Steve Gomez, who worked for the FBI as part of a joint task force with the Los Angeles Police Department when it launched a collaboration in the wake of the riots that followed the beating of Rodney King, said that that was “very similar to what is occurring in Baltimore.”Gomez, now a consultant for ABC News, said Baltimore police “clearly need assistance from various agencies and now they’re going to get it.”“Obviously, they’re overwhelmed,” he added.Rioting in Baltimore took place after the funeral service of Freddie Gray in late April, who died from injuries he suffered while in police custody.“It’s a snowball effect from the time that the riots began moving forward … Violence begets violence and the criminals are feeling empowered to commit more crime,” Gomez said.One of the benefits of calling in the federal agents, Gomez said, was that in addition to using the extra resources available at the federal level, they will be able to take on more cases that may have been passed over if the extra staff weren’t on hand.“They'll authorize the federal agencies ... basically to investigate and take in cases that normally may not meet the prosecuting threshold and that’s because of the rise in violence and the federal government along with the state of Maryland are reprioritizing and committing their agencies to take on cases that will help deal with the rise in violence in Baltimore,” he said.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Second Longest Escalator in the Western Hemisphere Makes Debut


WJLA-TV(BETHESDA, Md.) -- One Metro escalator in Bethesda, Maryland is not for the faint of heart.With a rise of 106 feet and a length along the diagonal of 212 feet, it's the second longest escalator in the Western Hemisphere, according to the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority (WMATA), which debuted the new moving staircase Monday after a nine-month renovation period.The longest escalator is in the system's Wheaton Station, according to the WMATA.The ride down in Bethesda is just under three minutes.“This is a significant improvement for our customers at Bethesda Station,” Metro said in a statement. “This first new entrance escalator will provide more reliable service for the thousands of passengers who travel through the station each day.”The station, which services nearly 11,000 commuters each weekday, according to WMATA, is undergoing a multi-million dollar renovation, which includes the new escalators and improvements to lighting.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Memphis Cop Killing: Suspected Gunman Added to Most Wanted List


iStock/Thinkstock(MEMPHIS, Tenn.) -- The man who's at-large after being accused of killing a cop in Memphis this weekend was added to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation's Top Ten Most Wanted List.The suspect, 29-year-old Tremaine Wilbourn, is considered to be armed and dangerous, police said.As the manhunt intensifies Monday, here is a closer look at how the incident unfolded:THE TRAFFIC STOP:Saturday night, Memphis police officer Sean Bolton saw an illegally parked 2002 Mercedes-Benz, police said.Bolton pulled in front of the car and shined his spotlight inside.Bolton then went up to the car, where he engaged in a "brief struggle" with the car's passenger, according to police.THE SHOOTING:The passenger, identified as Wilbourn, allegedly shot Bolton several times, police said. Wilbourn and the car's driver fled after the shooting.When officers responded to the scene and searched the suspect's car, they determined "Bolton apparently interrupted some sort of drug transaction," police said.Officers found digital scales and a bag containing 1.7 grams of marijuana in the car, police said.The car's driver later turned himself in, police said, and was released without charges.THE OFFICER:Bolton, 33, was taken to a hospital in critical condition. He was later declared dead, police said.Bolton had been a member of the Memphis Police Department since 2010. Bolton was also a Marine veteran who had served a tour in Iraq, police said."To lose a loved one or a family member is a horrific event," Memphis police director Toney Armstrong said.Armstrong added, "We lost not only an officer, but a great man, a dedicated servant to our community, and a family member."THE MANHUNT:Wilbourn is still at-large on Monday, Memphis police told ABC News.A murder warrant has been issued for his arrest, police said.Police said Wilbourn is out on supervised release after being sentenced to 10 years for bank robbery.Wilbourn is considered to be armed and dangerous, police said. A $10,000 reward has been announced for his arrest.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Mass. Researchers Identify Two Great White Sharks Close to Shore


Wayne W.Davis/Atlantic White Shark Conservancy(NEW YORK) -- Two great white sharks were spotted off the Massachusetts coast.The photos -- shared Sunday by the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy -- show a research boat close to one of the two sharks they were able to positively identify on July 28.“We spotted multiple sharks on Tuesday and got enough footage of two for the scientists to ID them,” Atlantic White Shark Conservancy president Cynthia Wigren told ABC News Monday.Some of the sharks got as close as a quarter-mile away from the shore, while others were further out, Wigren said.Marine Fisheries Biologist John Chisholm was on board the boat, while a photographer was able to get aerial photos of the research encounter.The conservancy is working alongside Chisholm -- who did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment -- to complete a five-year white shark study to determine how many white sharks are in the Cape Cod area.In 2014, the first year of the study, they were able to identify and record 68 white sharks.Wigren said this season, 16 new sharks have been identified and three have been tagged.“Activity so far is greater than last year, but the season doesn’t end until the end of October,” she said.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Pedro Hernandez Gets New Trial Date in Etan Patz Abduction Case


EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — A judge in New York set a retrial date for the man charged in the abduction and murder of a boy who was the first missing child featured on a milk carton. Pedro Hernandez will go on trial again starting in late February after his first trial ended with a hung jury. Eleven jurors wanted to convict Hernandez of kidnapping and killing Etan Patz in 1979, but there was a lone holdout.“I couldn’t find enough evidence that wasn’t circumstantial to convict,” the lone juror said at the time.There was no physical evidence, but Pedro Hernandez confessed to killing the boy.Defense attorneys questioned whether Hernandez was mentally sound enough to confess.Patz’ father Stan is still waiting for his family’s long ordeal to be over.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Jury in James Holmes Trial Reaches Verdict in Sentencing Phase


ABC News(CENTENNIAL, Colo.) -- The jury in the sentencing phase of the James Holmes murder trial has reached a verdict on all counts. The verdict will be read Monday at 2:30 p.m. ET.The jury reached its decision after deliberating for less than two hours.If jurors believe the defense has outweighed the manner of the crime, Holmes would receive life in prison. If they do not, a penalty phase would continue with jurors hearing from family and friends of victims and then choosing between life in prison or the death penalty.Last month, Holmes was convicted of killing 12 people and wounding 70 others at a midnight screening of The Dark Knight Rises in Aurora, Colorado on July 20, 2012.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Hitchhiking Robot's Journey Cut Short in Philadelphia


hitchBOT(PHILADELPHIA) — A Canadian robot hitchhiking across the United States had its journey cut short in Philadelphia after its arms were ripped off and its head was left on the ground.The child-sized hitchBOT can snap photos and carry on limited conversations, according to its website. Created as a social experiment by Canadian researchers, the robot had previously hitchhiked across Canada and parts of Europe with its owners tracking it via GPS.Oh dear, my body was damaged, but I live on with all my friends. Sometimes bad things happen to good robots! #hitchBOTinUSA— hitchBOT (@hitchBOT) August 1, 2015That all came to an end this past weekend when hitchBOT sent back a macabre photo showing it had been destroyed.The robot was two weeks into its journey to hitchhike from the East Coast to San Francisco when it met its demise in the City of Brotherly Love.It's unknown who was responsible for destroying the robot.ABC US News | World NewsCopyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

7-Foot Alligator Washes Ashore on South Carolina Beach


Rainer Hengst(CHARLESTON, S.C.) -- Rainer Hengst expected to see his family surfing the waves, not an alligator.Officials tracked and caught a 7-foot alligator that came up on the beach in Pawleys Island, South Carolina, Sunday morning, police told ABC News on Monday.Hengst noticed a commotion on the beach and a small crowd gathered to watch an alligator swim close to shore. He took his camera to the beach to get photos of his family surfing the swell, but was able to shoot photos of the alligator instead.“The alligator would come in to about knee-deep water and then go back out,” Hengst said on Monday.“It’s unusual to see alligators in the ocean, but not unheard of. I’ve lived here for 10 years and this was my first time seeing one out there,” he added.Police on four-wheelers followed the slow-moving alligator for two hours as it traveled about a mile up the shore. The contracted gator removal team was able to lasso the alligator and relocate it away from the beach, police chief Michael Fanning said on Monday.Surfers and beachgoers got back in the water once the alligator was caught.This is the second time this summer police have had to remove an alligator stuck in the ocean's current, Fanning said.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

How the Memphis Cop Killing Unfolded


iStock/Thinkstock(MEMPHIS, Tenn.) -- As the manhunt intensifies Monday for the gunman accused of killing a cop in Memphis, Tennessee, this weekend, here is a closer look at how the incident unfolded:THE TRAFFIC STOP:Saturday night, Memphis police officer Sean Bolton saw an illegally parked 2002 Mercedes-Benz, police said.Bolton pulled in front of the car and shined his spotlight inside.Bolton then went up to the car, where he engaged in a "brief struggle" with the car's passenger, according to police.THE SHOOTING:The passenger, identified as 29-year-old Tremaine Wilbourn, allegedly shot Bolton several times, police said. Wilbourn and the car's driver fled after the shooting.When officers responded to the scene and searched the suspect's car, they determined "Bolton apparently interrupted some sort of drug transaction," police said.Officers found digital scales and a bag containing 1.7 grams of marijuana in the car, police said.The car's driver later turned himself in, police said, and was released without charges.THE OFFICER:Bolton, 33, was taken to a hospital in critical condition. He was later declared dead, police said.Bolton had been a member of the Memphis Police Department since 2010. Bolton was also a Marine veteran who had served a tour in Iraq, police said."To lose a loved one or a family member is a horrific event," Memphis police director Toney Armstrong said.Armstrong added, "We lost not only an officer, but a great man, a dedicated servant to our community, and a family member."THE MANHUNT:Wilbourn is still at-large on Monday, Memphis police told ABC News.A murder warrant has been issued for his arrest, police said.Police said Wilbourn is out on supervised release after being sentenced to 10 years for bank robbery.Wilbourn is considered to be armed and dangerous, police said. A $10,000 reward has been announced for his arrest.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Kaiser Carlile, 9-Year-Old Bat Boy, Dies After Being Struck by Bat


Liberal Bee Jays(LIBERAL, Kan.) — A 9-year-old bat boy for a Kansas baseball team died Sunday, one day after he was accidentally struck by a bat during a game.Kaiser Carlile, the bat boy for the Liberal Bee Jays summer team in Liberal, Kansas, was struck in the head as a player took practice swings during Saturday’s game against the San Diego Waves. Carlile was wearing a helmet.He was hospitalized in critical condition after being struck by the bat.“With the permission of the family, and with much sorrow and a very broken heart, I regretfully inform everyone that Kaiser Carlile passed away earlier this evening,” team president Nathan McCaffrey wrote in a statement. “Please keep his family and our team in your thoughts and prayers. Thank you all for the support during this ordeal.”Kadon Simmons, a player on the team, referred to Carlile as "a little brother I never had" in an Instagram post."No person or team could ask for a better bat boy," Simmons wrote. "It is terrible to see you leave in such a way, but knowing your last moments were on the baseball field makes it easier through this whole process, because you were doing what you loved."The Liberal Bee Jays play in the Jayhawk Baseball League, a summer league for college players.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Baltimore Police Teaming with Federal Law Enforcement to Combat Spike in Violenc


Alex_Schmidt/iStock/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) -- Police in Baltimore announced that they are collaborating with a number of federal law enforcement partners to help quell a surge in violence the city has seen in recent weeks.The Baltimore Police Department will work with the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Agency, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the U.S. Marshals and the Secret Service, starting Monday. Each agency will send a pair of full-time special agents to be embedded in the BPD's homicide unit.The Baltimore Sun reports that 10 people were shot -- including seven in one incident -- overnight Saturday into Sunday.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Port Authority Investigating Drone Incident Near New York's JFK Airport


Stockbyte/Thinkstock Images(NEW YORK) -- New York's John F. Kennedy International airport was the site of another drone incident on Sunday evening.A Shuttle America flight from Richmond, Va. was coming in for a landing when the pilot spotted a drone off to the left of his plane. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was made aware of the incident and is investigating. The Federal Aviation Administration has launched a campaign following a distressing number of drone incidents, warning drone users to stay away from airports.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

At Least One Killed When Wind 'Uprooted' Tent at Festival near Chicago


Monkey Business Images/Thinkstock(WOOD DALE, Ill.) -- At least one person was killed when a tent was uprooted at a festival today in the Chicago suburb of Wood Dale."Hail and extremely high winds uprooted a large tent" at the Wood Dale Prairie Fest Sunday afternoon, according to the Wood Dale Police Department Facebook page.One person was killed and 15 people were hospitalized, police said.The police called it a "tragic accident" and said the incident is under investigation."Our most sincere thoughts and prayers go out to those affected by today's event," the police wrote.Sunday was the last day of the four-day festival, which includes live music, a carnival and fireworks, according to the city.Police said the rest of Prairie Fest has been cancelled.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Person of Interest in Custody in Connection to Memphis Officer Slaying


iStock/Thinkstock(MEMPHIS, Tenn.) -- A person of interest is in custody in Tennessee Sunday after a Memphis police officer was shot and killed Saturday night, an ABC affiliate reported.No charges have been filed, according to ABC's Memphis affiliate, Local 24 News. The police said in a tweet that the investigation is ongoing.Saturday night, officer Sean Bolton was shot several times during what appeared to be a traffic stop, the Memphis Police Department said. Bolton, 33, was hospitalized and later died.Bolton had been a Memphis police officer since 2010, the police said.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Two Explosive Devices Detonate Outside Churches in New Mexico


iStock/Thinkstock(LAS CRUCES, N.M.) -- Two explosive devices were detonated on Sunday morning at two churches.ABC News affiliate KOAT-TV reports that the explosions happened within minutes of each other with one of them happening in a mailbox at Calgary Baptism Church.The other explosion occurred in a trash bin outside the Holy Cross Church, according to authorities. No injuries were reported.Both the FBI and the Las Cruces Police Department will investigate.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

From Wild Drinking, Drugs Scandal to Cyber Security Savior?


Win McNamee/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A U.S. government contractor, several of whose employees were caught on video drunk and drugged on a sensitive security mission in Afghanistan, is now being used to help fix the massive security breach at the Office of Personnel Management.“What are they thinking?” asked Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-MO, who is now demanding to know how the company got its contract from the OPM despite the previous outrageous behavior and with no competitive bidding.“This is a company that has demonstrated irresponsibility,” McCaskill told ABC News for a report to broadcast Friday on “ABC World News Tonight With David Muir”. “What in this company’s background gave them assurances that they are the company that can handle this incredibly sensitive matter at a time that Americans are really worried about the federal government’s ability to protect personal data?”The company, formerly known as Jorge Scientific, was awarded the “sole source” contract to overhaul OPM’s computer network last year after hackers believed to be from China stole the personal records of more than 22 million U.S. government employees.Just three years ago, Jorge Scientific was the subject of an ABC News investigation that featured video from whistleblowers showing employees staggeringly drunk while working as security personnel for the US government in Afghanistan.In one video sequence, the company medical director was seen semi-conscious, with an syringe next to him.The company changed its name after the ABC News report, said it fired all the employees involved and hired a new president.Under its new corporate name, Imperatis, and with a new board of directors featuring high-ranking former military officials, the company has continued to receive hundreds of millions of dollars in U.S. contracts, including the contract with OPM.”This is a company with a bad record that has engaged in gross improprieties in the workplace,” said Sen. McCaskill. Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, brought up Imperatis' checkered past in a Congressional hearing last month, saying the sole-source contract “does beg a lot of questions.”And now other questions are now being raised about $135 million in what Sen. McCaskill calls “improper payments” involving another government contract.In an audit report published in April, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) found the company could not provide documentation for the $135 million it collected for expenses.“And when you can’t provide documentation for $135 million worth of work, that raises some red flags and it should have raised red flags,” said John Sopko, the inspector general, in an interview with ABC News. “So we’ve been questioning that and it’s raised a lot of suspicions for us."In a statement provided to ABC News, the company disputed the inspector general’s findings, and said it is confident that a review by the Army Contracting Command “will substantiate the costs in question by year’s end.”The firm also said it has worked with OPM since 2014 after a system there was breached and “Imperatis proudly stands behind the work we are doing for OPM.”The company added that it agreed the behavior of its employees on the video seen on ABC News was “inappropriate.”“Imperatis was launched in early 2013 after problems arose at our predecessor company, Jorge Scientific,” the statement said, before describing the leadership shakeup. “We did this with the express intent of inspiring new values, ethics and culture into our company, and to restore the highest possible standard of integrity and professionalism.”OPM spokesperson told ABC News they were still investigating the facts behind the selection of Imperatis, and added the Department of Homeland Security “officially owned the contract,” although OPM officials had recommended the choice of Imperatis.ABC US News | World NewsCopyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Individual Jumps Bike Rack in Front of White House


Joe Ravi/iStock/ThinkStock(WASHINGTON) -- An individual jumped the bike rack on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House but not the actual fence, the Secret Service said Friday.A statement from Brian Leary, spokesman for the U.S. Secret Service said, "At approximately 7pm tonight, an individual jumped the bike rack on Pennsylvania Avenue. The individual was immediately arrested by USS Uniformed Division Officers The individual is currently charged with "Unlawful Entry" and was transported to the Metropolitan Police Department 2nd District."The incident prompted a temporary lockdown of the White House but the lockdown has since been lifted.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Close Call: Delta Pilot Spots Drone Just Before Landing


Boarding1Now/iStock Editorial/ThinkStock(NEW YORK) -- A Delta pilot flying into JFK airport in New York spotted a drone off its right wing as it approached the runway, the Federal Aviation Administration said Friday.The plane, an MD88 with five crew members and 154 customers on board, did not take evasive action and landed without incident, according to the FAA.“About a mile back, there was a drone flying just on the southwest side,” the pilot tells Air Traffic Control, according to audio provided by LiveATC.net.“At what altitude?” the controller asks.“I’d say 100 feet below us, just off the right wing,” the pilot responds.“JetBlue, use caution,” the controller then warns another plane. “The one that’s ahead of you reported a drone.”Friday's incident comes on the heels of another close encounter in New York earlier this year, which forced a plane flying near LaGuardia Airport to climb 200 feet to “avoid” an unmanned aircraft hovering 2,700 feet over Brooklyn.Amid an alarming number of drone incidents, the FAA has launched a campaign warning hobbyists and other unmanned aerial vehicle operators to stay away from airports.ABC US News | World NewsCopyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Watch Another Heated Traffic Stop Made by Cop Accused of Killing Samuel DuBose


Hamilton County Sheriff's Office(CINCINNATI) -- The police officer charged with murdering Samuel DuBose during a traffic stop earlier this month reportedly had another controversial run-in with motorists last year that was caught on video.The revelation comes as union officials fought to get Ray Tensing's job back. Tensing was fired immediately after he was indicted on murder.It also came as prosecutors announced that two other officers who responded to DuBose's  stop won't face charges after a grand jury declined to indict them. Prosecutors said they were cooperative and their statements matched footage on Tensing's body camera.In May 2014 -- less than a month after Tensing joined the University of Cincinnati Police Department -- Tensing was engaged in a heated exchange with two men after pulling their car over because he said their bumper was dragging, according to ABC affiliate WCPO-TV in Cincinnati.In the encounter, Tensing asks the passenger, Demetrius Pace, for his name and birthday. When Pace provided his name, but refused to give his birthday, Tensing said he'd charge him with refusing to identify, WCPO-TV said.Tensing tells Pace to get out of the car, according to the video, and Pace says, "What's the charge?""Step out of the car," Tensing says. Pace asks, "What am I stepping out of the car for?" and Tensing replies, "Because I asked you to."Later in the video, Pace and the driver, Sexton Henley, request a supervisor. They claimed they were being harassed, detained without being told why and not being let go, according to the video.Pace asks Tensing, "Are we free to go? Can you write the ticket so we can go?"Tensing responds, "You're not free to go right now.""What are we doing then?" Pace asks, and Tensing says, "You're being detained right now."Tensing tells them, "You guys wanted a supervisor?" and Pace said, "It don't matter."Pace and Henley also ask Tensing for his name and tell him they are recording the incident, according to the video that WCPO-TV broadcast.When the shift supervisor arrived, the driver, Henley, was given an equipment violation ticket for the bumper, according to WCPO-TV.The passenger, Pace, later told WCPO-TV, "I shouldn't have even been questioned.""He [Tensing] should have dealt specifically with the driver," Pace said.According to WCPO-TV, the Cincinnati Police Department is investigating whether a complaint was filed from Pace and Henley's incident or any other traffic stops made by Tensing.On Wednesday, Tensing, 25, was indicted on one count of murder and one count of voluntary manslaughter for the shooting death of the unarmed DuBose at a traffic stop July 19.DuBose apparently refused to provide a driver's license, produced an open alcohol bottle and a struggle ensued, police said. According to the police report, "Officer Tensing said he was being dragged by the vehicle and had to fire his weapon."A video released by the Hamilton County Prosecutor's Office shows the shooting from Tensing's body camera. A second video released by the Prosecutor's Office -- from the body camera of an arriving officer -- shows Tensing lying in the road before he gets up to run toward DuBose's crashed car. Neither video appears to show Tensing being dragged as he has told investigators, according to a police report and his radio call.In the official interviews from the other two officers -- who aren't facing charges -- "neither officer said that they had seen Tensing being dragged," according to Hamilton County Prosecuting Attorney Joseph Deters.On Thursday Tensing pleaded not guilty to murder and involuntary manslaughter.He posted $100,000 cash bond. If Tensing is convicted on all charges, he faces life in prison.ABC US News | World NewsCopyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Charleston Church Shooting Suspect Dylann Roof Pleads Not Guilty


Grace Beahm-Pool/Getty Images(CHARLESTON, S.C.) -- Alleged Charleston, South Carolina, church shooter Dylann Roof appeared in court Friday to face federal hate crime charges.Roof's new attorneys told a federal judge that Roof is prepared to plead guilty to 33 federal hate crimes stemming from last month's massacre at Emanuel AME Church that killed nine people.But, the defense attorneys said, he wouldn’t do that until prosecutors decide whether to seek the death penalty. In the meantime, a not guilty plea was entered on Roof's behalf.Roof appeared in a striped jumpsuit, shackled, betraying no emotion.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

University of Cincinnati Police Officer Pays Bond, Released from Prison


Hamilton County Sheriff's Office(CINCINNATI) -- Officer Ray Tensing, charged in the shooting death of Sam Dubose, was released from a Cincinnati area prison on Thursday.Tensing had been on suicide watch until his release at about 6:35 p.m. Thursday. Hamilton County Sheriff's Office Major Charmaine McGuffy said at a press conference outside the jail that Tensing had not received any special treatment. The officer spent his time in protective custody unit and was well-guarded.Tensing reportedly posted $100,000 cash bond, the standard 10 percent of the $1 million figure set by a judge on Wednesday.Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Deliberations Begin in James Holmes Murder Trial


Arapahoe County Sheriff's Office(CENTENNIAL, Colo.) -- The jury in the James Holmes murder trial went home Friday now without reaching a decision with plans to continue deliberation on Monday.Jurors were told to arrive at the Arapahoe County Courthouse prepared for a marathon afternoon. On Thursday, the jury received instructions and heard closing arguments from both the defense and the prosecution. The jury is supposed to deliberate on phase two -- whether the defense outweighed how Holmes committed the crime.If jurors believe the defense has outweighed the manner of the crime, Holmes would receive life in prison. If they do not, a penalty phase would continue with jurors hearing from family and friends of victims and then choosing between life in prison or the death penalty.The jury made no decision on Thursday, though. The day in court was briefly interrupted when a woman who told officers she was homeless reportedly yelled out "don't kill him."Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.